We were impressed with the high quality and excellent shooting qualities of the Ritter & Stark SX-1 rifle. But perhaps the most impressive feature of the rifle is how easy it is to swap the barrel and change calibers. The real test though, is how well does the rifle hold its zero and accuracy after swapping that barrel and we figured there was only one real way to test it. That was with a real world test with uncut video. Watch our latest episode of Sniper Talk to see how it does.

2 Comments

Martin

Not sure of the price point SX1 but I think Desert Tech has an edge on this rifle since you appear to mount your scope to the barrel on the SX1 which means you need a separate scope for each barrel. On the DT you mount the scope to the receiver so only one scope needed. You need multiple scopes for different calibers for SX1 just like the Thompson Center Encore. Barrel swop is much faster on the DT as well. I cant complain about zero maintenance on my DT. IMHO, the cost savings in additional quality optics for each barrel and the faster swop time makes the DT a better idea.

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mele-02

We have shot the DT as well, nice setup, though the one we tested was an early production version. The scope mounted to the barrel has pluses and minus. You mention the down side, but it does help with keeping the zero fixed with less shift, in theory. But we still saw about a .5 – 1 MOA when removing and then putting the barrel back on. The Barrett MRAD is another alternative. In terms of price, they all run about the same, though if you do have additional optics for each barrel that adds cost. Though its pretty simple to move scopes from barrel to barrel, but again, now we are introducing additional moving parts and more potential for zero shift.

Some also view the mounting of the scope to barrel as a plus, it allows for a complete “system” style swap out. You have have a smaller powered scope more suitable for DMR/Urban use with the .308 barrel, and then a higher power optic mounted to the .338 Lapua barrel for long range work. Making the system a more suitable “situational” switching than just changing the caliber.

Lots of good thoughts though!

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