The Remington 700P is a very nice sniper rifle for the money. This “Entry Level” rifle is quite capable of shooting .5 MOA right out of the box (.75 MOA is more common). This rifle has all the right features for the right price. It uses a HS Precision stock with palm swells and an aluminum bedding block. The actual action and barrel are the same that are used on Remingtons varmint rifles, with the difference mainly in the stock. Packaged combinations, known as the 700P Tactical Weapons System (TWS) can be bought from the factory and includes a carrying case, Harris Bi-Pod and a Leupold Veri-X III 3.5-10x Tactical Scope with Duplex reticle. The package has some other goodies also.

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The 700P (and its variants) have come to be the standard for police agencies. Remington has been introducing new models also, including the LTR and others. The LTR was designed as a lighter weight, compact tactical rifle for urban situations. It has a 20″ fluted barrel and a slimmed down stock. Accuracy is about the same as the standard 700P, but you will lose some velocity with the shorter barrel. Technically, Remington only sells them to law enforcement, but the rifles are available through various distributors to civilians.

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36 Comments

Bryan Webster

I have the LTR version with the fluted 20 inch barrel, and have found the rifle really likes the A-Max bullets. Did not use overly hot loads but depending on conditions at the range, accuracy was around 1/3 to 3/4 inch groups at 100 yards with the 155 grain bullets. Have yet to try the 168 and 178 A-Max bullets, but suspect it will do well with those too. Given the long freebore, I was at a quandry as to bullet seating lengths, so just stuck to the published COAL for the specific loads described in the latest Hornady manual.

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Rey

I came across a distinctive 700P the other day out at a rang. It was a 26″ fluted 700 in.308. I asked who worked on it and kid said it came stock from factory. I looked online and see no other 700P in that configuration. Am I seeing unicorns? Pros & con’s to a fluted 26″?

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Mel Ewing

Hum, while the flutes on a 26″ barrel is not a standard configuration, Remington does do a lot of special runs that it could have been a part of. They do make their sendero’s with flutes and some others, so it would not be out of the question. The flutes reduce the weight of the barrel and rifle and it increases the surface area of the barrel which supposedly allows the barrel to cool faster. The cons are that while the barrel is the same stiffness as another barrel OF THE SAME WEIGHT, it is still less rigid than the barrel was before the flutes were applied.

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Tim

Rey and Mel,
The rifle you saw sounds like the 1st Rem 700 in .308 I bought myself back in the mid 90’s. Depending on what style HS Precision stock it has, (heavy, all black Police version with large palm swells, or the lighter Varmint type with the splatter effect paint scheme) it might be the short action version of the Sendero (long action) series. The one you described sounds like the VSF (Varmint Synthetic Fluted), which was blued. The more common model was the stainless version known as the VSSF (Varmint Stainless Synthetic Version). I topped mine with the Leupold 3.5-10x50mm 3/4 MilDot for my training rifle since I couldn’t pull my M24 out of the armory whenever I wanted, and it still out shoots more expensive rifles today. 168gr FedGMM would keep them touching at 100yds. It’s one sexy rifle.

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Mel Ewing

Tim,
The interesting thing is the year and who had it. In 1986 the M24 was not yet in service and it would have been questionable if the 700P’s were around quiet yet either and I do not believe the varmint synthetics were. The 80’s were a transition decade for sniper rifles and there are a lot of question marks about these rifles Rey is talking about. If we had a picture of them it would be interesting to investigate further.

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Bryan Webster

Update:
Got some 178 gr A-Max and shot one group at -28 Degrees C. All bullets were touching each other at 100 yards but did not measure the group. about .4 to .5 inches for 5 shots. Have been unable to obtain the Hornady 168 Gr A-Max or even the 168 Gr Sierra Matchkings so far.

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Mel Ewing

Fantastic! That 178gr amax bullet is a good one, so even if you didn’t get any 168s to try, I think you found a load that rifle likes and it’ll be a good one for long range work as well.

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D. Richards

We have 6, Rem. 700 LTR’s with the 20″ fluted barrel for our dept., by policy we can only carry and use Federal 168 Grain Gold Metal Match BTHP. Shooting from a “Cold Bore” with 5 shots groups, 2 of the rifles shot .5” or less at 100 yards. 3 rifles shot .6” groups and the last rifle shot .7, 5 shot groups also at 100 yards. Looking now to purchase a Delta series custom rifle from Tactical Operations Inc.

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Yanni K.

I have an LTR which I have setup with Leupold MK rings and a Vortex HD 5-20 scope and Harris bipod. I have tried various ammo but again and again I am getting the best accuracy with Federal 168gr MK. I shoot consistently 0.5 moa all day long. The rifle itself I have not touched or modified at all.

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Bryan Webster

I wonder if anybody here can tell me for certain what trigger comes on these rifles. I read on the Sniper Central forums that some of them may have a Remington 40X trigger but not sure about what is one the one I have, and did not see any markings on it to tell me much.

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Mel Ewing

They come with the old style Remington trigger (not the XMarkPro, but the one with the ribbed trigger shoe). For a while Remington made some LTR’s with 40x triggers for one of the big distributors. You can tell by looking at the trigger, if it has vertical ribs and the trigger shoe AND there is an external adjustable allen screw at the top of the shoe (to adjust trigger weight) then its a 40X trigger. I suppose, unless you purchased the rifle new, there is the chance that someone replaced the factory trigger with an after market one as well.

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Jordan C

Hi Mel, I just bought a 700P LTR and realized, after the fact, that I have the standard Remington trigger. Not the 40x. I was feeling a little duped by my LGS but it sounds like this is not uncommon for LTRs on the market. Is that so?

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Mel Ewing

Yeah, most of the 700LTR’s do not have the 40x trigger, only a few do. But it should at least have the older Remington trigger (not the XMarkPro) with groves on it.

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Timothy Spann

I just purchased a Remington 700 (Long Range in 30-06). It has the bell and Carlson40 stock with 26 heavy barrel, X-mark trigger and aluminum bedding block. Have u reviewed this gun? I got a couple 1/2 Mia groups at 100 out of the box, anyway what upgrades would u make to improve accuracy without breaking the bank

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Mel Ewing

That rifle you have is a good solid rifle from the factory. Your cheapest and first upgrade would probably be to replace the trigger with a nicer aftermarket setup. And then practice!

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kmr

I am in the market for the 700 LTR 223 and just confirmed (July 2015) with the Remington customer support that the Model 25737 comes with 40-x trigger.

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Hamza

Hi there.
I would like to ask from. where can i find the magazine spring..My was broken by my self and because i am living in Bulgaria can i order a new one freely

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Bryan Webster

I upgraded my LTR a bit this summer. Added Farrell 20moa base and also bedded the rail, then put installed a new Sightron SIII S-TAC 3.5 to 17.5 X 56 scope followed by a Jewell
trigger. I also had the entire action skim bedded with Devcon plastic putty and did an additional bit of bedding in about two inches in front of the recoil lug area. The rifle always shot well, but is far more consistent now.

For hunting use, I found Speer 180 grain SPBT bullets shot into well under 1/2 inch at 100 yards for 8 three shot cold bore groups, and went with that. Very pleased, as these bullets have a decent Ballistic coefficient and the rifle likes them. Shots for big game with these are not generally going to be way out there in any event although paper targets out to 750 meters showed that it works well.

My Hornady 155, 168 and 178 grain A-max loads all shoot well but so far I have not taken the time to shoot to longer ranges with these.

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Bob R

Hey Mel,
I want to purchase a 700, 308. There is way to much info to digest. I am looking for an average priced weapon, matte black or camo or OD green. I need dependability and quality in manufacturing. Any help? Which would you recommend. To me they are all awesome weapons.

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Mel Ewing

There are a lot of options available, but your budget will determine a lot of what will work. I would certainly be looking at a bolt action (extremely reliable) and a heavy barrel for accuracy. Reminton, FN, Savage, and others all have good options

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Bob R

Bob R
January 24th, 2016

Thanks for the quick response, I am really looking to get a Remington, model 700 series. I will be using it primarily for hunting. Just seems like when I read all the various reviews there are so many “good” ones. $1,000. will get a lot, just want to spend wisely. Thank you sir for your time.

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Bob R

Thanks for the quick response, I am really looking to get a Remington, model 700 series. I will be using it primarily for hunting. Just seems like when I read all the various reviews there are so many “good” ones. $1,000. will get a lot, just want to spend wisely. Thank you sir for your time.

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Russ H

I read the comments about the Rem 700 as an entry level weapon and about all the 100 yard shots. I have to tell you, we had the Rem 700 (M40A1) 7.62mm (308) with a cheap 9 x 40mm scope in the Marine Corps and after our armorer worked on it, it was far from an entry level weapon. We could make kill shots at 1000 meters or more. Hell we was making kill shots at 1000m with a M14 and iron sights. The Rem 700 is a remarkable weapon.

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Mel Ewing

The term “entry level” is used to designate a rifle that is lower priced and not a full blown custom built sniper rifle. It is a very good description of the 700P rifles and they make very good entry level sniper rifles. Tests are conducted at 100 yards to get the ultimate accuracy capability without the weather effects that come into play at longer ranges. We have shot plenty of these rifles out to, and beyond 1000 yards. But they are still an entry level sniper rifle. The M40A1 that you mention was/is an excellent rifle, but they are not entry level as they were hand built by USMC armorers and not factory stock 700s. Both of them are excellent rifles, though the M40A1 is in a different class than a 700P and they only thing they share in common is the 700 action.

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Dave Livingston

Mel, Do you remember an offering from Impact Guns mid to late 2000’s for an accurized Remy 700 LTR? I bought one and it is amazing and was wanting to find out who did their work. I’ve got another build in mind on a 5r platform.

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Michael Robinson

I have one of these in 300 Win. Mag. , no one has mentioned this cal. Are they a little rarer? I really appreciate the accuracy of this weapon. Premeir Reticle Gen 2 Mil Dot Leupold works very well with this setup.

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Mel Ewing

They are not as common as the 308 rifles, and they are a good solid rifle. For a short time Remington actually made the 700P in 7mm Rem Mag as well. We have one of those here, but its never been fired.

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Mel Ewing

The sendero’s are different, so you cannot really say whether it is better or not. They have different stocks, metal finish etc. Accuracy will be about the same

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Tony

I’m in the process off purchasing a 700 ltd 20’in 308 for long range tac matches and as a light hunting rifle. Once i get it it will be have an ego 20moa rail, magpie hunter stock and an ior
buchuresti 4-14×50 scope. I’ll also be running met 10 round mags. Has anyone had any experience with trigger tech triggers? I’m thinking about replacing the stock mark pro with one?

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